Sorry folks! For access to these hot springs you´ll have to fork out a fee if things go to plan. PIC katy_nicholson

Sorry folks! For access to these hot springs you´ll have to fork out a fee if things go to plan. PIC katy_nicholson

Don´t get us wrong. It was never cheap to visit this wind-blown island in the Atlantic and is not cheap by any standards today. Any farmer with a crummy bed and crummier breakfast will demand 75€ / 98$ for a friggin´ night and that´s just if you are lucky. Hostels or hotels will on average cost much more.

But now a new phenomenon is on the rise. Vast swathes of land here is privately owned and sadly some of Iceland´s most precious natural wonders are completely owned by dubious characters.

Now, these individuals are using increasing numbers of tourists as a leverage for closing access to these natural pearls and demanding a special fee from anyone entering.

So far in Iceland anyone has been able to visit most, if not all, of the country without problems or payments. But greed is a powerful thing and masses of tourist are likely to pay top fee for access if they have made the trip anyway.

Some could say the owners are in perfect right to demand payment for allowing visits on their land. But the catch is those same individuals have already gotten millions from the government for the access anyway. Not to mention the government built roads and services.

So, now you should expect to pay to see Dettifoss waterfall and a big chunk of the stunning hot spring area around Namafjoll mountains in Myvatn in the North of Iceland. You should also expect to pay to see the Geysir area soon and already you are paying more for a visit to Thingvellir area and the Blue lagoon.

Yup, the downsides of tourism boom are many.