So many variables determine if those magnificent flickers in the sky will be visible or not. PIC Diane Robinson

So many variables determine if those magnificent flickers in the sky will be visible or not. PIC Diane Robinson

T aking tourist to see the Northern Lights, or Aurora Borealis to use the technical term, is a huge business in the Northern hemisphere these days. Greenland, Iceland, Canada, Alaska, Norway and Finland compete for tourist dollars and no one can really say which one is the best place at any given time.

One major problem with Aurora Borealis sighting is how many factors have to come together for the skies to light up and preferably over your head. Not only does the sun have to bombard the planet with its solar flares, so to speak, but the skies above have to be pretty free from cloud cover for anyone to catch a glimpse.

A few parties nowadays offer so-called Aurora forecasts to help folks in determining when and where to go and be at any given time. Unfortunately these are still much less reliable than regular weather forecasts and only really work a day or two in advance at best.

In any case, we know everyone should see this magnificent show of lights at least once in their lifetime and here are a few guiding pages with detailed info about the very best chances of seeing one in person.

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