When you have oranges you make orange juice. But that does not mean your juice is very good. PIC Dagur Brynjolfsson

When you have oranges you make orange juice. But that does not mean your juice is very good. PIC Dagur Brynjolfsson

W e knew that would get your attention. And your likely first thought was along the lines of “what crazy son-of-a-xxxxx goes to Iceland for surfing?”

Let´s get the obvious out of the way. Iceland is no Hawaii. No Big Kahunas over here.

What we do have in abundance are beaches and the fact this place is squarely in the way of the Atlantic ocean. While there is some ocean flow from the equator northwards we will have waves crashing the shores. Which, incidentally, is every surfers wet dream.

How wet a dream? Let us put it this way. There is nothing special about surfing these parts except perhaps the cold. The sea around Iceland hardly goes above a couple of degrees Celsius at best. Which means you will have to bring and wear a wetsuit or a drysuit and preferably quick access to a hot tub afterwards.

But surfing here is very possible and quite a few foreigners do visit exclusively to try the waves. Where they go does not much matter. Wind is a pretty constant companion around here and in most places by the seaside there is a chance of catching a wave or two at any given moment.

But like always there´s a downside. Most beaches here are rocky and jagged and a novice should seek warmer seas else the return trip could be in a closed black bag.